It’s no secret that the fantasy genre is one of the most popular genres going, particularly in literature. There’s something about being whisked away to a world unlike anything we’ve ever known that captivates our imagination like nothing else. Series like The Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter and A Game of Thrones have all taken the world by storm. Perhaps it’s thanks to their sprawling landscapes and endless fountain of characters, whatever it is people cannot seem to get enough. So maybe you too have a fantasy story in you? Or an entire saga even? If you’re thinking on creating your own tale of adventure and intrigue why not take a look at a few of these tips to help you along the way.

Read other Fantasy Books
Read other Fantasy Books

Read other Fantasy Books

The first thing anybody should do before writing a book in any genre is make sure that they are reading other books, lots of them. The more your read other books the more you will absorb and learn before writing your own. How can you know what makes a good fantasy book if you’ve never read one? Get down to your local library, bookstore, head to the Kindle store, however you want you read just go ant pick up some books and dive in. Check out the classics, the bestsellers, the award winners and anything that interests you. You’ll soon pick up what you like and what you dislike as well as absorbing new ideas and writing points like grammar, structure, prose and rhythm. Why not start by heading out there and picking up 10 books some new and some you’ve read before. Take note of their strengths, their characters, scenery, plot, everything you enjoy about them and add those finds to your own repertoire.

Ditch the Cliché
Ditch the Cliché

Ditch the Cliché

Tropes are common in the fantasy genre, things like magic, dragons and castles are ten a penny and that’s all well and good. Often, it’s the tropes that can be the best thing about these stories, that is after all how they became tropes in the first place. That doesn’t mean however that you have to be a slave to their clichés too. Think of new and exciting ways to involve these classic features, take dragons, for example, before they became the fire breathing beasts, we know today they almost exclusively shot poison from their mouths, if anything at all. They were also serpents, though throughout time they evolved in literature. In their character, they are often hoarders and captors, usually of a princess’s in distress, now look at A Game of Thrones, here we see that cliché spun on its head. Here we see dragons owned and even imprisoned by a princess instead. Be creative with your tropes, have fun with them and maybe even add something to them that nobody has ever seen before. Think also about plot clichés and how you can spin these into the very opposite.