Write with Your Senses

When I say “write with your senses”, I should imagine that it’s fairly obvious that I don’t mean literally (please don’t start typing with your tongue). What I mean here is that when writing, try to evoke all of the senses when describing things. Say you have your protagonist entering a rowdy tavern (as they are of course inevitably going to do this), rather than simply describe the visual appearance of the room and the number of people that reside in there instead talk about the sound of patrons drunkenly singing in the corner, the smell of cooked pork and spilt mead, the warm air from the nearby fire and the taste of a freshly poured ale. By describing these things, we paint a picture of the room without being literal and dull. It also helps to convince the reader of the more fantastic details in your story, if they can feel like they’re there they can believe it in a heartbeat.

Don’t Bombard us with All of Your Characters at Once
Don’t Bombard us with All of Your Characters at Once

Don’t Bombard us with All of Your Characters at Once

It’ll quickly become evident that when writing an epic series, you’re going to be creating a lot of characters. So many in fact that you will struggle to keep track of them, imagine then how hard a reader will find it. It’s important that you slowly drip feed your characters throughout the story as opposed to introducing as many as you can on one page. You cannot expect your reader to memorise each individual you have come up with straight off the bat, especially before you’ve actually fed them any story. If your readers are not committed to what they are reading, why would they learn who these characters are? This is a common mistake people make when they first start out and it’s one of the best ways to get readers to drop your book faster than you decided to drop in those characters. Introduce them when the story demands it, people will remember them if they feel they can associate them with the plot.

Work Your Magic
Work Your Magic

Work Your Magic

If you’re fantasy world includes magic (and let’s face it, it probably does), then don’t neglect to show how it works. Magic is often the thing that makes these stories the most exciting, it’s what separates them from the world we know. Don’t be afraid to explain how it works, take for example the Discworldbooks, magic here exists in the air around us, you can often feel its density and wizards draw upon to cast their spells. The Chronicles of Narnia has portals that were created by Digory Kirke’s bizarre uncle. Even Star Wars talks about how ‘the force’ is the connection between all life. Come up with your own unique magic and try and think outside of the box with it, maybe you’ll create the next Platform 9 ¾ with enough imagination.